Family elders on my father's side (King). - itsaboutnature.net
This image taken just after WW2.  

Here is my Aunt, Carol King, who just happened to be in the only remaining image taken of this side of my Grandparent's  "New Camp".  In this image Carol is a happy young girl, several years away from being voted Miss Deering High in 1957 (Portland, Maine), and living all the troubles that go with adolescence.  Somewhere there is an image of her on a swing, behind the camp, and my Grandfather told how he could see Carol in the swing down below, when he was up on Mount Abraham.  The whole place was so idyllic....until we started firing the guns.  We always had guns around us and we loved shooting them. 

This image had to have been taken just about the year I was born (1948).  I  spent my most cherished years around this camp with my Grandparents and the family, from the 1950's to 1980 (the year that my Grandfather passed away).  The night he passed away unexpectedly, I visited him and finalized plans for our fishing trip a few days away,  to West Lake in Central Maine for Landlocked Salmon.  It was my turn to be the guide and I knew right were to go for him to catch his first salmon.  I loved spending time in the wilds with my Grandfather.   What kid wouldn't?  The last thing he said to me before I left him that night was "Don't forget the life preservers Bobby."  That night, he died from an aneurysm that was caused by years of smoking.   Isn't there a lesson there?

THOSE WERE THE DAYS MY FRIEND!
In my mind, I can still hear the screen door slapping shut on the camp while I was way down in the woods.  Behind Carol, there would be a window placed in that opening in the new addition.  Through that window we would  look across the knoll and down into Salem village and the intersection of Rte. 142 and the Lovejoy Road, about 2000 feet away.  In those days, the bridge over the river in Salem was one of those metal ones that hummed when a vehicle passed over it.  

And since a vehicle passed through Salem only about every hour or so (That is no exaggeration!), when you heard it, and you were expecting someone in the family to show up at camp..........you hurried over to this window and looked down at the intersection, 2000 feet away.   It is the absolute truth.   It was so quiet, you could hear every vehicle that passed through Salem by the sound of that bridge.   Because the  Lovejoy Road is dead straight, you could look through that window and tell within a few seconds if anyone turned onto it from Rte. 142. If the car turned onto the road, it was a sure bet it was coming to our camp, because in those days, there was just one other dwelling on the Lovejoy Road from my Grandparent's camp right back to the base of Mount Abraham, and it was also seasonal.  

 "Oh it's David and Dana coming!....or......here comes Dad and Bruce!"    Those were the best days of my life !  It was idyllic......just like in the movies.

Robert King Jr.

This image taken just after WW2.

Here is my Aunt, Carol King, who just happened to be in the only remaining image taken of this side of my Grandparent's "New Camp". In this image Carol is a happy young girl, several years away from being voted Miss Deering High in 1957 (Portland, Maine), and living all the troubles that go with adolescence. Somewhere there is an image of her on a swing, behind the camp, and my Grandfather told how he could see Carol in the swing down below, when he was up on Mount Abraham. The whole place was so idyllic....until we started firing the guns. We always had guns around us and we loved shooting them.

This image had to have been taken just about the year I was born (1948). I spent my most cherished years around this camp with my Grandparents and the family, from the 1950's to 1980 (the year that my Grandfather passed away). The night he passed away unexpectedly, I visited him and finalized plans for our fishing trip a few days away, to West Lake in Central Maine for Landlocked Salmon. It was my turn to be the guide and I knew right were to go for him to catch his first salmon. I loved spending time in the wilds with my Grandfather. What kid wouldn't? The last thing he said to me before I left him that night was "Don't forget the life preservers Bobby." That night, he died from an aneurysm that was caused by years of smoking. Isn't there a lesson there?

THOSE WERE THE DAYS MY FRIEND!
In my mind, I can still hear the screen door slapping shut on the camp while I was way down in the woods. Behind Carol, there would be a window placed in that opening in the new addition. Through that window we would look across the knoll and down into Salem village and the intersection of Rte. 142 and the Lovejoy Road, about 2000 feet away. In those days, the bridge over the river in Salem was one of those metal ones that hummed when a vehicle passed over it.

And since a vehicle passed through Salem only about every hour or so (That is no exaggeration!), when you heard it, and you were expecting someone in the family to show up at camp..........you hurried over to this window and looked down at the intersection, 2000 feet away. It is the absolute truth. It was so quiet, you could hear every vehicle that passed through Salem by the sound of that bridge. Because the Lovejoy Road is dead straight, you could look through that window and tell within a few seconds if anyone turned onto it from Rte. 142. If the car turned onto the road, it was a sure bet it was coming to our camp, because in those days, there was just one other dwelling on the Lovejoy Road from my Grandparent's camp right back to the base of Mount Abraham, and it was also seasonal.

"Oh it's David and Dana coming!....or......here comes Dad and Bruce!" Those were the best days of my life ! It was idyllic......just like in the movies.

Robert King Jr.