Family elders on my father's side (King). - itsaboutnature.net
Our paternal Grandmother (Beda Belle King, 1908- March 23, 1986), on the fender of a 1928 Chrysler Model 62 at what I believe to be the new Rosedale Street, Portland, Maine....circa 1934.  It was about that time that Gram and Gramp (as we called them), had a house built at 35 Rosedale street.  

The folks at the Antique Automobile Club of America identified  the car.  Later, I verified their accuracy  by entering the make, model and year at  “Google Images”.  Thanks to AACA.com and Google.

Reference that "Tydol" sign in the car's radiator:  In the 1920's, the Tidewater Oil Company sold motor oil in eastern America under the brand name of Tydol.  As an afterthought, for those who do not know, I should explain why the piece of sign is there in the first place:  That large, rectangular black surface is the radiator.  In cold weather, anything flat, such as a piece of cardboard,  placed over a section of the vehicle's radiator will decrease the air flowing through to the radiator baffles and thus decrease the cooling.  In the end, it is there to increase the engine's temperature,  probably so that the people can get more heat to the vehicle's interior. 


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tidewater_Petroleum

Grammy was adopted and raised by the Passmores, who owned a dairy farm, directly across Auburn Street from the now Shaw's North gate shopping center, Portland, Maine.   If you're from Portland you never knew there was once a dairy farm there did you?  It was there from the 1800's and into the 1930's.

And last, I should mention that I do not know the name or ownership of the dog on the right margin, as I do not recall the family mentioning a dog of that description.  Update:  the dog's name is Cookie

Elders are full of fascinating information.  But few of us in our high tech societies refer to them.  In the less-than-high-tech societies the Elders make sure that ALL information is passed down to subsequent generations.   

I now regret not having talked at much greater length with my Elders regarding the way things were.  It is sad......because now it is too late and maybe that is why I now try to pass on as much information as I can.

Our paternal Grandmother (Beda Belle King, 1908- March 23, 1986), on the fender of a 1928 Chrysler Model 62 at what I believe to be the new Rosedale Street, Portland, Maine....circa 1934. It was about that time that Gram and Gramp (as we called them), had a house built at 35 Rosedale street.

The folks at the Antique Automobile Club of America identified the car. Later, I verified their accuracy by entering the make, model and year at “Google Images”. Thanks to AACA.com and Google.

Reference that "Tydol" sign in the car's radiator: In the 1920's, the Tidewater Oil Company sold motor oil in eastern America under the brand name of Tydol. As an afterthought, for those who do not know, I should explain why the piece of sign is there in the first place: That large, rectangular black surface is the radiator. In cold weather, anything flat, such as a piece of cardboard, placed over a section of the vehicle's radiator will decrease the air flowing through to the radiator baffles and thus decrease the cooling. In the end, it is there to increase the engine's temperature, probably so that the people can get more heat to the vehicle's interior.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tidewater_Petroleum

Grammy was adopted and raised by the Passmores, who owned a dairy farm, directly across Auburn Street from the now Shaw's North gate shopping center, Portland, Maine. If you're from Portland you never knew there was once a dairy farm there did you? It was there from the 1800's and into the 1930's.

And last, I should mention that I do not know the name or ownership of the dog on the right margin, as I do not recall the family mentioning a dog of that description. Update: the dog's name is Cookie

Elders are full of fascinating information. But few of us in our high tech societies refer to them. In the less-than-high-tech societies the Elders make sure that ALL information is passed down to subsequent generations.

I now regret not having talked at much greater length with my Elders regarding the way things were. It is sad......because now it is too late and maybe that is why I now try to pass on as much information as I can.